First episode impressions: ‘Kevin (Probably) Saves the World’

"Kevin (Probably) Saves the World" (8 p.m. Eastern Tuesdays on ABC) is both the most original show of the fall TV slate and very familiar. Let me explain: On one hand, there's nothing else like it on TV now. On the other hand, it has many forebearers in the genre of supernatural beings influencing a normal person's actions. Or sometimes the main character is a supernatural being but appears to be normal.

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First episode impressions: ‘The Gifted’

Because of a bizarre reticence to turn big-ticket properties into TV series, the 2000 "X-Men" film inspired things like "Mutant X," "Heroes," "No Ordinary Family" and "The Cape" but not an actual "X-Men" series -- until this year. First up was FX's "Legion," a show so confusing I don't know when or on what timeline it takes place. But "The Gifted" (9 p.m. Eastern Mondays on Fox) is more accessible.

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Catching up with ‘Big Little Lies’

"Big Little Lies" (which aired earlier this year on HBO, and can now be found on HBO Go or at Redbox) is the best thing I've seen from David E. Kelley, and also by far the most tolerable. Although I used to like "The Practice," it grated on me after a while, and I didn't make the switch over to the by-all-accounts even-crazier spinoff "Boston Legal." But this miniseries is only seven episodes long, the perfect length for a viewer to appreciate the Kelley trappings before they overstay their welcome.

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10 years ago, ‘Family Guy’ delivered the ultimate ‘Star Wars’ parody with ‘Blue Harvest’

There are broad "Star Wars" parodies, and then there are insider-y "Star Wars" parodies, and then there's a near-perfect mix of the two: The "Family Guy" episode "Blue Harvest," which aired 10 years ago today. According to the DVD's bonus features, the project came about when Lucasfilm approved all of "Family Guy's" "Star Wars" parodies and Seth MacFarlane and company figured why not ask if they could do a whole episode?

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Fall TV: One new show and five returning shows I'm looking forward to

There are more good TV shows than ever before – so much so that TV overload has become an issue for even the biggest TV geeks – but they premiere throughout the calendar year now. As such, Fall TV ain't what it used to be. Still, there's something traditional and nostalgic about getting that Entertainment Weekly Fall TV Preview in the mail. Not willing to wait any longer for mine to arrive so I can research the offerings, here are my picks for one new show and five returning shows to watch (all times Eastern):

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Catching up with ‘Westworld’ Season 1

When I got a few months of free HBO with my new Dish Network subscription, the first show I programmed into my DVR was "Westworld," which launched with a 10-episode season in 2016 (and will return next year). Evan Rachel Wood ("Once and Again") and the universally great reviews from critics and fans (9.0 on IMDB) drew me in, the entertainment value kept me there, and the non-cliched way it delves into the oldest sci-fi theme ("What defines humanity?") has me still thinking about it.

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TV shows lost to history: ‘Cupid’ (1998-99)

When I think of Rob Thomas' TV shows, "Veronica Mars" and "iZombie" immediately spring to mind, but that leaves out what might be his best show: "Cupid" (1998-99, ABC). Remarkable for Thomas' first creator/executive producer credit, this 14-episode series (plus one never-aired episode) deserves a spot on the short list of great TV shows about romance, and unfortunately it's also on the short list of shows that are heartbreakingly lost to history.

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TV shows lost to history: ‘FreakyLinks’ (2000-01)

"FreakyLinks" (2000-01, Fox) was neither great nor terrible, but it has an important place in television history, which is why it's a shame it hasn't been preserved on DVD. (It has been rerun on Chiller, but not regularly enough to break out of the "lost to history" label.) The first faux-found-footage series in TV history, it exists entirely because of the success of the surprise 1999 movie hit "The Blair Witch Project."

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TV shows lost to history: ‘Miss Match’ (2003)

"Miss Match" (2003, NBC) ranks toward the top of the list of shows that were destined to be sure-fire hits yet somehow weren't. Alicia Silverstone was Entertainment Weekly's Fall TV Preview cover girl, the show was the magazine's pick for Best New Drama ("Arrested Development" was the Best New Comedy, if you're curious) and it was the only scripted show specifically about romance on TV that season.

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TV shows lost to history: ‘Young Americans’ (2000)

Perhaps more so than any other TV show lost to history, "Young Americans" (2000, The WB) benefits from a rewatch. Although I watched the whole eight-episode run in the summer of 2000, I never embraced it.

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