Self-centered Supergirl does the minimum of superhero work, but somehow is seen as a role model

CBS' "Supergirl," which recently wrapped up its first season, raises compelling questions about the societal role of someone blessed with extraordinary skills. Although Supergirl is held up as a paragon of virtue by the citizens of Capital City -- and the world – an observer could make a case that she's barely doing the minimum for someone who is made of steel and who can quickly fly anywhere in the world without her arms even getting tired.

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Batman and Superman could’ve avoided fighting if they had just talked it out

"Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice," the second entry in the DC Universe film saga that started with 2013's "Man of Steel," is more engaging than its rather boring predecessor, due largely to the novelty factor of seeing these two icons – plus Wonder Woman – in the same movie. As with "Man of Steel" -- like this film, directed by Zack Snyder -- there's a jarring disconnect between the computer-generated fight scenes and scenes of characters talking to each other, and it feels like the former category dominates the film. (Spoilers follow.)

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First episode impressions: ‘Supergirl’

"Supergirl" (8 p.m. Eastern Mondays on CBS) is a slickly produced and nicely acted but utterly unnecessary and unimaginative addition to TV's comic-book superhero boom. Because it's in the same timeslot as another DC adaptation, "Gotham," and the year's best new show, "Crazy Ex-Girlfriend," my DVR wouldn't record it and I watched it on the Internet. It was hardly worth the extra effort.

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‘Terminator’ flashback: ‘Superman versus The Terminator: Death to the Future’ (2000)

Writer Alan Grant started his 13-issue run on "The Terminator" with the gritty, adult-oriented "Death Valley," then followed it up with the shallow "The Dark Years," and he closes on an even weaker note with the kiddie-oriented "Superman versus The Terminator: Death to the Future" (2000). I wasn't a "Superman" fan to begin with, but this four-issue series does nothing to pique my interest in that saga, and it also treats the "Terminator" concept shallowly.

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