‘Dollhouse’ flashback: ‘Epitaphs’ comic series (2011-12)

On the Season 2 DVD, Joss Whedon says "Dollhouse" was a pebble he could've turned over for as much as seven seasons. Unfortunately, we only got 26 episodes, but "Epitaphs" (2011-12) – a six-issue comic book series from Dark Horse – turns over the pebble of this great concept a little bit more.

[More]

Rewatching and reviewing the classics: ‘Dollhouse’ Season 2 (2009-10)

It started as an anthology show that allowed Eliza Dushku to play a different character every week, but in its second season (2009-10, Fox), "Dollhouse" embraces its identity as a serial story exploring what makes a person a distinct individual. It approaches this theme from dozens of different angles, but rather than running off the rails, it's not only comprehensible, but also compelling and insightful.

[More]

Rewatching and reviewing the classics: ‘Dollhouse’ Season 1 (2009)

Coming out five years after Joss Whedon's Big Three series ("Buffy," "Angel" and "Firefly") left the airwaves, "Dollhouse" Season 1 (2009, Fox) had massive shoes to fill. On its original airing, I saw it as an experimental series that allowed Eliza Dushku to fulfill the actor's dream of playing different roles while also having a steady job. And it was hard not to be distracted every time another Whedonverse alum (Amy Acker! Alan Tudyk!) popped up.

[More]

Is ‘Dollhouse’ channeling Philip K. Dick?

For anyone who wanted to look closely, the "Dollhouse"-Philip K. Dick comparison has been obvious since the first episode, but it has really struck me during this more serialized second season.

[More]

The truth about ‘Dollhouse’: It’s Ballard’s show, not Echo’s

From the beginning, "Dollhouse" was a rickety premise for a series, but it strikes me as being purposely rickety -- as if creator Joss Whedon wants to challenge himself -- with each episode attempting to prop up the foundation.

The series came about when Whedon dreamed up a vehicle for star Eliza Dushku while they were having dinner. Although she was great as Faith on "Buffy," Dushku has the typical TV actor's desire to play a variety of characters rather than developing one character.

[More]